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New Image College has zero-tolerance for any illness symptoms. If employees, students, or instructors are not feeling well, they are asked to stay home and contact the school immediately.

Stay Home When Sick

Staying home when sick is one of the most important ways to reduce the introduction to and the spread of COVID-19 in schools.

  • Perform a daily health check.
  • Stay at home when sick.
  • Get a health assessment and/or COVID-19 test when sick.

These steps do not replace the usual health care. Health questions can be directed to 8-1-1 or your health care provider.

Daily Health Check

    Students, employees, and instructors are required to perform a daily health check every day.

    A daily health check is a tool to reduce the likelihood of a person with COVID-19 coming to school when they are infectious. Please perform a daily health check every day before coming to New Image College. The following is an example of a daily health check to determine if you should attend the school that day.

    If you answered “YES” to one of the questions included under section 1 (excluding fever)

    • IF YOU ARE AT HOME: please refrain from coming to school. Stay home for 24 hours from when the symptom started. If the symptom improves, you may return to school the next day when you feel well enough. If the symptom persists or worsens, seek a health assessment.
    • IF YOU ARE AT SCHOOL: if the symptom arises while you are in school, please gather all your personal belongings and check out at the front desk. Please leave New Image College for the day and stay home for 24 hours from when the symptom started. If the symptom improves, you may return to school the next day when you feel well enough. If the symptom persists or worsens, seek a health assessment. The full protocol is described below.

    If you answered “YES” to two or more of the questions included under section 1 or have a fever

    • IF YOU ARE AT HOME: please refrain from coming to school and seek a health assessment.
    • IF YOU ARE AT SCHOOL: if the symptom arises while you are in school, please gather all your
      personal belongings and check out at the front desk. Please leave New Image College and
      seek a health assessment. The full protocol is described below.

    If you answered “YES” to questions 2 or 3, please note:

    • People who are coming from overseas or are contacts of a confirmed case, meaning they have been or could have been exposed to the virus but do not have symptoms are required to self-isolate for 14 days since their last contact with the positive person or as soon as they arrive in Canada and monitor for symptoms.
      Self-isolation means staying home and avoiding situations where you could come in contact with others. You may have been exposed to the virus and are at risk for developing COVID-19 and passing it on to others. You should not self-isolate in a place where you will be in contact with vulnerable people, such as seniors and individuals with underlying health conditions.

    Other considerations

    Employees, students, and instructors may still attend school if a member of their household develops new symptoms of illness, provided the student/employees/instructor has no symptoms themselves.

    If the household member tests positive for COVID-19, public health will advise the asymptomatic student/employees on self-isolation and when they may return to school.

    Most illness experienced in B.C. is not COVID-19, even if the symptoms are similar.

    Employees, students, and instructors who experience symptoms consistent with a previously diagnosed health condition can continue to attend school when they are experiencing these symptoms as normal. They do not require re-assessment by a healthcare provider and should not be required to provide a health-care provider note. If they experience any new or unexplained symptoms, they should seek an assessment by a health-care provider.

    Protocol if Individuals Develop COVID-19 Symptoms on Campus

    1. The symptomatic individual is instructed to safely separate from the group and provide a confidential first aid assessment to the POC or CW. The College will maintain and keep records on first aid reports and incidents of exposure.
    2. Further to assessment, and unless further immediate care is required, the symptomatic individual will be advised to return to their place of residence and to contact 8-1-1 or their local healthcare provider for further direction, avoiding public transit where possible. Where necessary, the front desk will make arrangements for transportation for the symptomatic individual.
    3. The front desk will notify POC and CW of related cleaning requirements to ensure that cleaners are dispatched to clean and disinfect the space where the individual was separated and any areas used by them (e.g., classroom, bathroom, common areas).
    4. Through existing confidential communication processes, the front desk will notify the POC, CW, and instructors of an incident of a symptomatic individual on campus.
    5. POC and CW contact the individual to send COVID-19 Community Information and to begin and identify any close contacts, they may have had at the college, in case the individual tests positive.
    6. POC and CW follow up with the individual to monitor symptoms and the need to seek health assessment.
    7. POC and CS consult with Vancouver Coastal Health, if necessary.
    8. If the individual tests positive the college connects with the assistance of Vancouver Coastal Health those who were in direct contact with the COVID-19 positive individual while on campus and are considered high risk.
    9. Closure of classrooms or buildings to be decided based on guidance from Vancouver Coastal Health.
    10. Based on who the person had contact with or where they were while on campus, the following steps may be taken:
      1. office/workspace locked with no access for 14 days,
      2. extensive cleaning, and
      3. Vancouver Coastal Health contact tracing, including communication with affected persons.
    11. The individual cannot return to campus until they have been cleared by Vancouver Coastal Health.

      Health Assessment Protocols

      What is a Health Assessment?
      A health assessment includes

      • calling 8-1-1,
      • a primary care provider like a physician or nurse practitioner
      • BC COVID-19 Self- Assessment Tool https://bc.thrive.health/covid19/en

      If a health assessment is required, you should not return to school until COVID-19 has been excluded and your symptoms have improved.

      When a COVID-19 test is recommended by the health assessment:

      • If the COVID-19 test is positive
        • Employees, students, and instructors should stay home until you are told by public health to end self-isolation. In most cases, this is 10 days after the onset of symptoms. Public health will contact everyone with a positive test. Please notify the school immediately.
      • If the COVID-19 test is negative

        • Employees, students, and instructors can return to school once symptoms have improved and feel well enough. Symptoms of common respiratory illnesses can persist for a week or more. Re-testing is not needed unless a new illness is developed. Please notify the school.
      • If a COVID-19 test is recommended but is not done because employees, students and instructors choose not to have the test or do not seek a health assessment when recommended, and symptoms are not related to a previously diagnosed health condition
        • Employees, students, and instructors should stay home from school until 10 days after the onset of symptoms and then may return if feeling well enough. Please notify the school.
      • If a COVID-19 test is not recommended by the health assessment
        • Employees, students, and instructors can return to school when symptoms improve, and you feel well enough. Testing may not be recommended if the assessment determines that the symptoms are due to another cause (i.e. not COVID-19). Please notify the school.

        COVID-19 Testing Information

         Testing is available for all who need it but not everyone requires a test. If you develop symptoms, use the BC COVID-19 Self-Assessment Tool to help determine if you need further assessment or testing for COVID-19. You can complete this assessment for yourself, or on behalf of someone else if they are unable to. 

        Where to get a COVID-19 test

        You can get a COVID-19 test from a physician, nurse practitioner, urgent and primary care centre, or at a COVID-19 test collection centre. You can call 8-1-1 to find testing near you. Please visit an emergency department if you are experiencing health conditions that require urgent and emergency care.

        Vancouver Coastal Health test collection centres and urgent and primary care centres (UPCC) that offer testing and assessment are listed below. Please be prepared to wait in line. Test collection centres may have faster wait times. To find the wait times for some of the sites, please visit the wait-times website.

        Testing Sites

        Click on the links below for a list of collection centres in the province to find one near you. You can also call 8-1-1 to find the nearest centre. Most COVID-19 testing sites in B.C. can test children and youth.

         

        Vancouver Test Collection Centre – Parking lot adjacent to St. Vincent’s
        Parking lot, 4875 Heather Street, Vancouver, BC (map)
        Please do enter Honoria Conway
        8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., seven days a week
        Ages 4+
        Drive-up and walk-in available
        No appointment necessary

         

        Vancouver Test Collection Centre – North parking lot (#865) Vancouver Community College
        1155 East Broadway, Vancouver, BC (map)
        Entrance on 7th Ave. between Keith and Glen Drive, north parking lot #865
        No access through Vancouver Community College
        9:00 a.m. to 7:30 p.m., seven days a week
        Ages 4+; saline (gargle) test available for children
        No appointment necessary

         

        Vancouver Test Collection Centre – Downtown Eastside
        429 Alexander St., Vancouver, BC (map)
        10:00 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday to Friday (closed between 12:30 p.m. and 1:30 p.m.)
        No appointment necessary
         

        City Centre UPCC
        1290 Hornby Street, Vancouver, BC (map)
        8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m., Monday to Saturday and 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m, Sunday
        Ages 12+
        No appointment necessary

         

        REACH UPCC
        1145 Commercial Drive, Vancouver, BC (map)
        Monday to Saturday, 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. and Sunday, 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
        All ages
        Please call 604-216-3138 for all COVID-19 related inquiries – appointments only at this time (no walk-ins)
         

         

        Isolating in the home setting Information

        The following instructions are intended for a case (symptomatic or asymptomatic), for whom home isolation has been deemed appropriate, and their household members (caregivers, roommates). Additional advice is available on:

        Individuals who need to isolate themselves include:

        • Confirmed cases with symptoms
        • Confirmed cases without symptoms (asymptomatic)
        • Probable cases
        • Suspect cases

        The case should isolate themselves in the home setting, away from other household members, for a minimum of 10 days or up to 14 days from the onset of symptoms. The criteria for discontinuing home isolation includes:

        For symptomatic cases:

        • at least 10 days or up to 14 days, as directed by the PHA, have passed since first symptom onset,
        • the case did not require hospitalization,
        • the case is afebrile and has improved clinically,
        • absence of cough is not required for those known to have chronic cough or for those who are experiencing reactive airways post infection.

        For asymptomatic cases:

        • at least 10 days or up to 14 days, as directed by the PHA, have passed since laboratory confirmation,
        • if symptoms appear, the individual should continue to isolate for 10 days or up to 14 days from the onset of the first symptom, as directed by the PHA.

         

        Stay home

        Staying at home means:

        • Not going out unless directed to do so (for example, to seek medical care with use of appropriate infection prevention and control measures)
        • Not going to school, work, or other public areas
        • Not using public transportation (for example, buses, subways, taxis)

        Self-isolation means staying home and avoiding situations where you could come in contact with others. You may have been exposed to the virus and are at risk for developing COVID-19 and passing it on to others. You should not self-isolate in a place where you will be in contact with vulnerable people, such as seniors and individuals with underlying health conditions.

         

        If you are a contact

        If you have been exposed to the virus, you will be contacted by your regional health authority’s public health team through a process called contact tracing. This means you are a contact of a confirmed case. If you do not have symptoms, you will be asked to self-isolate so that if you develop COVID-19, you won’t spread it to others in the community.  Learn about contact tracing and what’s involved on our Contact tracing page.

         

        See the self-isolation dos and don’ts information sheet:

        • Stay at home. Do not go to work, school, or public areas, do not use public transport or taxis.
        • Wash your hands or use alcohol-based hand sanitizer often.
        • Ask friends or relatives if you require help with buying groceries, other shopping or picking up medication. Alternatively, you can order groceries and medication by phone or online.
        • Do not have visitors in your home except if they are providing care or delivering goods and supplies, and in that case, maintain a distance of 2 metres.
        • Clean and disinfect high-touch surfaces.
        • Self-isolation can end 14 days after the last contact or return to Canada if you have not developed symptoms.

         

        Handouts:

         

        If you develop symptoms

        Symptoms of COVID-19 are like other respiratory illnesses. Commonly, these are fever, chills, cough or worsening of chronic cough, sore throat, runny nose and shortness of breath. For the full list of symptoms, visit the symptoms page.

        If you develop symptoms, you should get tested for COVID-19. If you are unsure, you can use the B.C. COVID-19 Self-Assessment Tool to help determine if you need further assessment or testing for COVID-19.  You can complete this assessment for yourself, or on behalf of someone else, if they are unable to.  Find a location to get tested

        • After doing the self-assessment tool, if you still have questions, contact your healthcare provider or call 8-1-1 for guidance.
        • If the symptoms are severe such as shortness of breath (e.g. struggling to breathe or speak in single words) or chest pain, call 9-1-1 or go to the nearest Emergency Department.

         

        Isolate after you develop symptoms

        • Ensure that you isolate immediately and avoid contact with others. You will need to continue to self-isolate while you wait for your test results. This means staying away from others as much as possible. See this guide to isolation if you have respiratory symptoms.
        • If you are caregiver to someone who has been diagnosed with COVID-19 or has respiratory symptoms and needs to isolate, see this guide for caregivers.

         

        How long to isolate if you have symptoms

        If you are diagnosed with COVID-19 and have symptoms that can be managed at home, please self-isolate until the following criteria are met:

        • At least 10 days have passed since the start of your symptoms, AND
        • Your fever is gone without the use of fever-reducing medications (e.g. Tylenol, Advil), AND
        • You are feeling better (e.g. improvement in runny nose, sore throat, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, fatigue).

        Coughing may persist for several weeks, so coughing alone does not require you to continue to isolate. If you are unsure whether your symptoms are related to allergies or an infection, check with your health care provider.

        Sometimes people with COVID-19 have mild illness, but their symptoms may suddenly worsen in a few days. If your symptoms worsen or you become short of breath, call your family physician or nurse practitioner for immediate medical attention. If you are unable to reach your regular care provider, seek care in an Urgent & Primary Care Centre (UPCC) or Emergency Department.

        If you became ill after being in contact with a confirmed case or arriving from outside of Canada, continue to self-isolate for 14 days or 10 days after symptoms started, whichever is longer.

        For more information, please visit our If you are Sick page. 

         

        How to isolate if you live with others

        It is better if those you live with can stay somewhere else, especially if they have a weak immune system or chronic health conditions. If you need to share a home, stay and sleep in a room with good airflow that is away from others. Use a separate bathroom if you can. Wear a face mask (surgical/procedure mask) if you are in the same room with anyone. Avoid face-to-face contact; friends or family can drop off food outside your room or home. If you are a caregiver to someone who has tested positive for COVID-19 or has respiratory symptoms see this guide.

         

        Monitoring symptoms
        The case should monitor self for symptoms and immediately report worsening of symptoms to a health care provider or PHA for further assessment.

        If it is determined that transfer to an acute care facility is required, the case will be provided with instructions regarding transportation (for example, by ambulance or private vehicle).

        • If calling an ambulance, the dispatcher should be notified that the case might have COVID-19.
        • If the person is transferred by private vehicle, the receiving facility should be notified to ensure that appropriate infection prevention and control measures are in place.
        • During travel, the ill person should wear a medical mask, or if not available, a non-medical mask or cloth face covering (for example, constructed to completely cover the nose and mouth without gaping, and secured to the head by ties or ear loops), if tolerable, or cover their nose and mouth with a tissue.
        • Those transporting the ill person should use appropriate personal protective equipment when within 2 metres of the ill person (details below).

         

        Limit contact with other people

        The case should avoid being in close proximity (within 2 metres) of other people, including household members and visitors who do not have an essential need to be in the home, with the exception of individuals providing care or delivering supplies or food.

        The case should stay in a separate room of their own so that they can be isolated from other household members.

        • If a separate room is not feasible, consider relocating the case or household members/roommates to another location.
        • Ensure that shared spaces are well ventilated (for example, windows open, weather permitting).
        • If relocation is not possible and the ill person is sleeping in the same room as other persons, it is important to maintain at least 2 metres distance from others (for example, separate beds and have people sleep head-to-toe, if possible). Hanging a sheet from the ceiling to separate the ill person from others could be considered.
        • If a separate bathroom is not available, the case should always lower the toilet lid before flushing to prevent contamination of the environment and the bathroom should be cleaned and disinfected frequently.

        When interactions within 2 metres are unavoidable (for example, case is a single-parent with young children), they should be as brief as possible, and the case should wear a medical mask, or if not available, a non-medical mask or cloth face covering (for example, constructed to completely cover the nose and mouth without gaping, and secured to the head by ties or ear loops). If possible, the ill person or caregiver should arrange to have supplies dropped off at their front door to minimize direct contact. If the case must leave the home setting, a mask should be worn.

         

        Limit contact with pets and other animals

        There have not been any reports of pets transmitting the SARS-CoV-2 virus to humans.  However, there have been several reports of infected humans spreading the virus to their pet dog or cat. It is still not clear how often this happens and under what circumstances. From the limited information available, it appears that some animals can get sick, therefore, it is recommended that the case also refrain with close contact with pets and, if possible, have another member of the household look after them. If this is not possible, practice good hand hygiene before and after touching animals, and their food/supplies, as well as good respiratory etiquette. Restrict the pet’s contact with other people and animals outside the household while the case is in isolation.

         

        Avoid sharing personal household items

        The case should not share personal items with household members or others, such as toothbrushes, towels, washcloths, bed linen, cigarettes, unwashed eating utensils, drinks, phones, computers, or other electronic devices.

        In the event that the case must prepare food for others (for example, single parent with young children), the case should perform hand hygiene before and after, adhere to respiratory etiquette, including wearing a mask, during meal preparation.

         

        Clean and disinfect all high-touch surfaces

        Disinfectants can kill the virus making it no longer possible to infect people. High-touch areas such as toilets, sink faucets, bedside tables, light switches and door handles should be cleaned and disinfected frequently using approved hard-surface disinfectants that have a Drug Identification Number (DIN). A DIN is an 8-digit number given by Health Canada that confirms the disinfectant product is approved and safe for use in Canada.

        • While most disinfectants will work against coronavirus, Health Canada has created a list of hard-surface disinfectants that are supported by evidence demonstrating that they are likely to be effective and may be used against SARS-CoV2.
        • Always read and follow the directions on the label to ensure safe and effective use, including information about how long the surface should be visibly wet to be disinfected.
        • You can also find more information on all other approved disinfectants and other drug products on Health Canada’s searchable Drug Product Database.

        Find more information on Health Canada’s website about using household chemicals safely and protect yourself and your family from poisonings when using disinfectants, household cleaning products and bleaches.

        If they can withstand the use of liquids for disinfection, high-touch electronics such as smartphones, computers and other devices may be disinfected with alcohol (for example, alcohol prep wipes).

        Disposable gloves should be used when cleaning or handling surfaces, clothing, or linen soiled with body fluids. Dormitories and co-living settings where ill persons are convalescing should be cleaned and disinfected daily.

        Toys and other objects children may have contact with that may have been contaminated by a case should be cleaned and disinfected daily.

        All used disposable contaminated items should be placed in a lined container before disposing of them with other household waste.

         

        Treatment
        The case should rest, eat nutritious food, stay hydrated with fluids like water, and manage their symptoms. Over the counter medication can be used to reduce fever and aches. Vitamins and complementary and alternative medicines are not recommended unless they are being used in consultation with a licensed healthcare provider.

         

        Monitor temperature regularly
        The case should monitor their temperature daily, or more frequently if they have a fever (for example, sweating, chills), or if their symptoms are changing. Temperatures should be recorded and reported to the PHA as per their instructions. If the case is taking acetaminophen (for example, Tylenol) or ibuprofen (for example, Advil), the temperature should be recorded at least 4 hours after the last dose of these fever-reducing medicines.

         

        Maintain a suitable environment for recovery

        The environment should be well ventilated and free of tobacco or other smoke. Ventilation can be improved by opening windows and doors to the outside, as weather permits.

         

        Stay connected
        Staying at home and not being able to do normal everyday activities outside of the home can be socially isolating. PHAs can encourage people who are isolating themselves at home to connect with family and friends by phone or computer.

        Precautions for household members (for example, caregivers, roommates) to reduce risk of transmission to others in the home

        For others in the home, it is important to take appropriate steps to protect themselves against COVID-19.

        • Perform regular hand hygiene. The case and the household members should perform hand hygiene regularly.
        • Practice good respiratory etiquette followed by hand hygiene.
        • Limit the number of caregivers. Ideally, the case should be able to care for themselves. Contact within 2 metres of the case should be limited to one person. Household members with risk factors for severe disease or outcomes (for example, older adults, chronic medical conditions, immunocompromised, or obesity) should not provide care for the case and should stay elsewhere if feasible.
        • Prevent exposure to contaminated items and surfaces. Do not use personal items that belong to the case. (see Avoid sharing personal household items)
        • Frequent cleaning and disinfecting. Refer to Clean and disinfect all high-touch surfaces
        • Disposing of waste. All used disposable contaminated items should be placed in a lined container before disposing of them with other household waste.
        • Use precautions when doing laundry. Contaminated laundry should be placed into a laundry bag or basket with a plastic liner and should not be shaken. Gloves and a mask should be worn when in direct contact with contaminated laundry. Clothing, linens, and non-medical masks and cloth face coverings belonging to the ill person can be washed together with other laundry, using regular laundry soap and hot water (60-90°C). Laundry should be thoroughly dried. Hand hygiene should be performed after handling contaminated laundry. If the laundry container comes in contact with contaminated laundry, it can be disinfected using approved hard-surface disinfectants or if not available, a diluted bleach solution can be used. Refer to Clean and disinfect all high-touch surfaces for instructions on diluting bleach.
        • Use of personal protective equipment. Household members, who have direct contact with the case, should wear a medical mask, or if not available, a non-medical mask or cloth face covering (for example, constructed to completely cover the nose and mouth without gaping, and secured to the head by ties or ear loops) and eye protection when within two metres and should perform hand hygiene after contact. Caregivers should wear disposable gloves, if available, when in direct contact with the ill person, or when in direct contact with the ill person’s environment as well as soiled materials and surfaces. Hand hygiene should be performed before putting gloves on and after removing them. Reusable utility gloves may be used; however, they must be cleaned with soap and water then disinfected after each use with approved hard-surface disinfectants, or if not available, a diluted bleach solution. Refer to Clean and disinfect all high-touch surfaces for instructions on diluting bleach.

         

        Supplies for the home when isolating

        • Medical mask, or if not available, a non-medical mask or cloth face covering (for example, constructed to completely cover the nose and mouth without gaping, and secured to the head by ties or ear loops) for case and caregiver in the home
        • Disposable Gloves
        • Eye protection
        • Thermometer
        • Fever-reducing medications
        • Hand soap
        • Alcohol based hand sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol.
        • Tissues
        • Waste container with plastic liner
        • Regular household cleaning products
        • Approved hard-surface disinfectants that have a Drug Identification Number (DIN) or if not available, household chlorine bleach (containing 5 % sodium hypochlorite, if available), and a container for dilution
        • Alcohol prep wipes or cleaners suitable for cleaning high- touch electronics (for example, phones)
        • Regular laundry soap
        • Dish soap
        • Disposable paper towels

         

        Government Financial Support
        Please check the SUPPORT FOR INDIVIDUALS section by clicking here https://www.canada.ca/en/department-finance/economic-response-plan.html

         

        Mental Health
        School Counsellor
        It is important to us that you succeed in your studies and career and we understand that the pressures of everyday life can be overwhelming at times. With that in mind, students and alumni can avail of on-campus confidential counseling courtesy of New Image College. Our counselor, Bill Dyck, is a registered clinical counselor who has over 45 years of experience in the field and is known for being skilled and easy to talk to. Speaking with a counselor can help clarify concerns or situations and open new ways of dealing with them. To book this complimentary service, please contact the Granville Campus’ Front Desk.

         

        Here2Talk: https://here2talk.ca/
        Connects students with mental health support when you need it. Through this program, all students currently registered in a BC pot-secondary institution have access to free, confidential counselling and community referral services, conveniently available 14.7 via app, phone and web.

         

        Wellness Together Canada: https://ca.portal.gs/
        Get connected to mental health and substance use support, resources, and counselling with a mental health professional

        For more information, visit: https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/diseases/2019-novel-coronavirus-infection/mental-health.html

         

        Header photo by Kelly Sikkema on Unsplash